South Carolina Pioneers

Barnwell County Wills, Marriages, Maps



Barnwell, South Carolina Willis Pond, Barnwell, South Carolina Barnwell, South CarolinaPictured is the Barnwell County country side and Wilis Pond. Barnwell County was originally part of Orangeburg District, and in 1785 it was named Winton County. It was given its current name in 1800 when it was named for John Barnwell (1748-1800), a Revolutionary War Leader. Barnwell County has decreased in size over the years as new counties were created within its boundaries (Aiken in 1871, Bamberg in 1897 and Allendale in 1919). The South Carolina Railroad, which connected Charleston to Hamburg on the Savannah River, was built through this area, creating the towns of Blackville and Williston in the mid-nineteenth century.

Early settlers to Orangeburg District: Robert McCampbell, Gabriel Moffitt, W. H. Lacy, Nathaniel Perry, and others.

Probate Records Available to members of South Carolina Pioneers Transcripts of Miscellaneous Wills and Estates (1787-1798)

Testators: Abney, Nathaniel; Adams, William; Alexander, Raine ; Ashley, Nathaniel; Bassett, William; Bates, Andrew; Blitchendon, John; Bowie, James; Boyit, William; Brown, Tarlton, Estate, 1845; Browne, Charles; Bryant, John; Burnley, John; Bush, John; Cannon, Reddin; Carrel, Thomas; Chase, Peleg; Chitty, John; Colding, Ann; Collins, James; Cooper, Nicholas; Crossle, William; Davis, James; Dillard, Barbara; Duglas, John; Dyckes, Isaac; Edward, David; Evoritt, William; Filput, Thomas; Fitts, John; Foster,Benjamin;Genkins,Elizabeth; Hankinson, Robert; Hargroves, Mary; Harley, Joseph; Hayes, Joseph; Heath, Benjamin; Henley, John; Hicks, Christopher; Huffman, Solomon; Jackson, James, Sr.; Johnson, William; Kirkland, Benjamin; Kirkland, Edward; Knucks, Thomas; Latham, George; Lee, Robert; Long, Levi; Matkinberhide, Martin; McNeely, Patrick; Moody, James; Moore, William; Myfser, John; Newman, Richard; Newman, William; Nobles, Nicholas; Odom, Thames; Parkinson, John; Platts, John ; Richards, James; Roberts, James; Robison, George; Rofe, John; Scarbrough, William; Shaw, Thomas; Smith, Stephen; Southwell, Edward; Stallings, James; Steed, Charles; Stivender, Avrehart; Taylor, John ; Thomas, Jacob; Thompson, John; Tindal, John; Touchstone, Fred, Sr.; Treadway, Richard; Turner, John; Vince, Joseph; Walker, George; Williams, John; Wood, John


God's Acre Healing Springs
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
By tradition, Healing Springs got its name during the Revolutionary War. The springs was first owned by Indians in the region who eventually sold it to Nathaniel Walker who paid for it in corn. The story goes that after the battle of Windy Hill Creek in 1781, four wounded Tories were sent inland from Charleston by General Banastre Tarleton, known as "the Butcher." and left in the care of two comrades who had orders to bury them when they died. However, they were found by some Indians and taken to their sacred healing springs. Six months later, the six men reappeared and shocked the Charleston garrison when they were discovered healthy.

Gods Acre Healing Springs
The name of the Springs was supposingly named after the two Tories were healed.


Map of Barnwell County


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